My Year Inside Trump’s Insane White House

My Year Inside Trump's Insane White House. www.businessmanagement.news

President Trump is using hardball tactics in an attempt to blunt the impact of Michael Wolff’s bombshell-filled book about his administration.

Wolff’s book is full of shocking quotes and claims about White House chaos and incompetence. The book affirms much of what’s been previously reported by other outlets and adds disturbing new details. But it also contains some errors, according to early reviewers.

President Trump on Thursday night lashed out at the author, while questioning the author’s “past.”

Trump wrote on Twitter that he gave author Michael Wolff “zero access” to the White House. The president claimed that he turned down the author “many times” and “never spoke to him for the book,” which he asserted is “full of lies” and “misrepresentations.”

A personal attorney for President Trump sent a cease-and-desist letter to Henry Holt and Wolff demanding that the book not be released.

Instead, the publisher is doing the opposite.

In the book, the author writes:

Here was a man singularly focused on his own needs for instant gratification, be that a hamburger, a segment on Fox & Friends or an Oval Office photo opp. “I want a win. I want a win. Where’s my win?” he would regularly declaim. He was, in words used by almost every member of the senior staff on repeated occasions, “like a child.” A chronic naysayer, Trump himself stoked constant discord with his daily after-dinner phone calls to his billionaire friends about the disloyalty and incompetence around him. His billionaire friends then shared this with their billionaire friends, creating the endless leaks which the president so furiously railed against.

One of these frequent callers was Rupert Murdoch, who before the election had only ever expressed contempt for Trump. Now Murdoch constantly sought him out, but to his own colleagues, friends and family, continued to derisively ridicule Trump: “What a fucking moron,” said Murdoch after one call.

The book also discussed Trump’s family, outsiders impressions of them, and the crazy atmosphere of the White House.

Scaramucci, a minor figure in the New York financial world, and quite a ridiculous one, had overnight become Jared and Ivanka’s solution to all of the White House’s management and messaging problems. After all, explained the couple, he was good on television and he was from New York — he knew their world. In effect, the couple had hired Scaramucci — as preposterous a hire in West Wing annals as any — to replace Priebus and Bannon and take over running the White House.

There was, after the abrupt Scaramucci meltdown, hardly any effort inside the West Wing to disguise the sense of ludicrousness and anger felt by every member of the senior staff toward Trump’s family and Trump himself. It became almost a kind of competition to demystify Trump. For Rex Tillerson, he was a moron. For Gary Cohn, he was dumb as shit. For H.R. McMaster, he was a hopeless idiot. For Steve Bannon, he had lost his mind.

The book discussed the Mueller investigation:

Most succinctly, no one expected him to survive Mueller. Whatever the substance of the Russia “collusion,” Trump, in the estimation of his senior staff, did not have the discipline to navigate a tough investigation, nor the credibility to attract the caliber of lawyers he would need to help him. (At least nine major law firms had turned down an invitation to represent the president.)

And who is Hope Hicks?

As telling, with his daughter and son-in-law sidelined by their legal problems, Hope Hicks, Trump’s 29-year-old personal aide and confidant, became, practically speaking, his most powerful White House advisor. (With Melania a non-presence, the staff referred to Ivanka as the “real wife” and Hicks as the “real daughter.”) Hicks’ primary function was to tend to the Trump ego, to reassure him, to protect him, to buffer him, to soothe him. It was Hicks who, attentive to his lapses and repetitions, urged him to forgo an interview that was set to open the 60 Minutes fall season. Instead, the interview went to Fox News’ Sean Hannity who, White House insiders happily explained, was willing to supply the questions beforehand. Indeed, the plan was to have all interviewers going forward provide the questions.

Most importantly, the author claims that everyone in the White House thinks that the president is incapable of executing the job.

Hoping for the best, with their personal futures as well as the country’s future depending on it, my indelible impression of talking to them (White House Staff) and observing them through much of the first year of his presidency, is that they all — 100 percent — came to believe he was incapable of functioning in his job.

At Mar-a-Lago, just before the new year, a heavily made-up Trump failed to recognize a succession of old friends.