Does Marijuana Use Promote More Sexual Activity?

Does Marijuana Use Promote More Sexual Activity?

Doctors from Stanford studied whether using cannabis promotes sexual behavior, and published the results of their study in the November issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Findings from previous studies regarding the effects of marijuana use on sexual function have been contradictory, with some reporting enhancement and others reporting negative effects including erectile dysfunction. The goal of this study by was to examine the possible association between marijuana use and sexual frequency in a nationally representative sample of men and women of reproductive age.

The Results:

Men and women who regularly use marijuana are having approximately 20% more sex than those who do not use marijuana, a new study shows.

“A positive association between marijuana use and sexual frequency is seen in men and women across all demographic groups,” the authors write, adding that its regular use “does not appear to impair sexual function.”

According to Dr Sun and Dr Eisenberg, the association between marijuana use and sexual function has long been a topic of debate, and data are lacking on this relationship.

The researchers therefore performed the study, which they say is the first of its kind, to investigate the relationship between marijuana use and sexual frequency at the population level in the United States.

They analyzed data from 51,119 respondents (55.1% women) ages 25 years to 45 years who participated in the National Survey of Family Growth. The survey, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is conducted annually and asks respondents about their frequency of heterosexual intercourse in the last 4 weeks, as well as their patterns of smoking marijuana during the previous year.

 

Women who reported no marijuana use in the past year indicated having intercourse 6.0 times, on average, during the last 4 weeks compared with 7.1 times among daily marijuana users.

In a similar manner, men who reported no marijuana use indicated having sex 5.6 times during the last 4 weeks compared with 6.9 times among daily users of marijuana.

This positive association remained across all cycles of the National Survey of Family Growth, as well as after adjustment that controlled for multiple socioeconomic and anthropomorphic factors.

“The overall trend we saw applied to people of both sexes and all races, ages, education levels, income groups and religions, every health status, whether they were married or single and whether or not they had kids,” Dr Eisenberg said.

“To our knowledge, we are the first to report an increase in sexual frequency linked to marijuana use,” the authors write.