Donald Trump’s current approval rating in Gallup’s weekly poll is just 38 percent, with 57 percent saying they disapprove. What is surprising about this isn’t that he has the lowest approval ratings of any president in recent history, but that 38% of Americans still approve of the man that has been called “The worst president ever.”

While most voters said Trump is not level-headed, honest or even fit to serve as president, some still approve of him. And that’s the problem. 

Today, even those whose job it is to sit in bunkers and await a signal to launch nuclear weapons— are tested three times per month on their ability to execute protocols. They are required to score at least 90 percent. Testing is not required for their commander in chief to be able to execute a protocol, much less his ability to demonstrate the high-level thinking that would set this process in motion.

A growing list of powerful men have faced serious consequences for sexual misconduct allegations, but the most powerful one of all has faced none. Instead, Donald Trump’s official position, as his spokeswoman Sarah Sanders recently clarified in a White House press briefing, is that the 20 women accusing him of assault and harassment are lying. Trump has also suggested some were not attractive enough for him to want to sexually assault.

This has been quite a year for America and the world. By most yardsticks, our nation seems to be going backwards: We have a billionaire president that shows no hesitation to making claims that are patently false. We have deepened the gap between rich and poor, made healthcare and college education further out of reach, eliminated environmental protections, and gave hefty tax breaks to the ultra wealthy. Here is a bit of this turbulent year in photos.

Republicans muscled the largest tax overhaul in 30 years through the Senate early Saturday, and in doing so, took off their masks and revealed to the world their true nature: that they only care about corporations and the wealthy, and that despite their repeated campaign promises to help the middle class and the poor, they never had any intentions of fulfilling those empty words that stir so many citizens to cast a vote against their own interests.

When the crowd chanted “Lock her up!” about Hillary Clinton, Michael Flynn smiled. “You’re damn right,” he told last year’s Republican national convention. “You’re exactly right. There’s nothing wrong with that! And you know why we’re saying that? We’re saying that because if I – a guy who knows this business – if I did a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today.”

Who were the worst American presidents? While it takes a rare combination of qualities such as strength of character, high principles, veracity, good judgment, and political skills to be considered the best of presidents, it takes a combination of persistent lying; failure to exercise good judgment; scandals; policies that weaken the country and hurt the economy; favoritism and cronyism; tax policy that enriches the elite while harming others; attacks on public institutions such as education, the arts, the environment, and a free and open media; and a general dereliction of duties, to be considered among the worst. The presidents listed below all shared some or more of those traits.

Congressional Republicans have argued that the tax overhaul will launch so much economic growth that it will generate additional revenue, allowing cuts to pay for themselves. But the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget said that it would not generate the kind of growth needed to pay for itself, and indeed, recent estimates from the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation found that both the House and Senate versions of a tax overhaul would add around $1.4 trillion in debt in order to pay for the tax breaks for the wealthy and corporations.

Mark your calendars: November 21, 2017 – the day the Internet died. For on that day, the Federal Communications Commission announced that it planned to dismantle landmark regulations that ensure equal access to the internet, clearing the way for companies to charge more and block access to some websites.

At least 58 people were killed and over 515 others were injured in a shooting near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Sunday, police said.

Police said the suspected gunman, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, was dead. Police said they believe Paddock, of Mesquite, Nevada, killed himself prior to police entry reported to be on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel.

As the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico continues, Donald Trump has spent the weekend using his favorite medium, his Twitter account, not to soothe emotions or offer succor to the people of the island but to pick an increasingly acrimonious fight with the mayor San Juan, its largest city, and to tell Puerto Ricans that the lack of water, food, and electricity they are experiencing is not reality but a fabrication by the news media.

Those words were said by our President, about the people living in Puerto Rico after two hurricanes devastated the island. It is impossible to tell whether this is a conscious racist remark by Trump, or whether it is instinctive. Either way, it is something that no other modern president would have said in public, and that no one who understood the duties of the office could have done.

The Department of Education officially revoked the Obama administration’s guidance on college sexual assault.

Sexual assault has become a hyper-partisan issue, with Democrats defending the rights of victims—and Republicans indiscriminately defending the rights of the accused—at times questioning the existence of the epidemic of sexual violence on college campuses.

Following the devastating Category 5 Hurricane Irma and now powerful Hurricane Maria, many travelers are concerned about their future holiday plans and what the effect has had at their favorite resorts. 

Sadly, thousands have lost homes and ability to work. We do not at all ignore their plight, but this report focuses on the damage to resorts, as a service to readers with upcoming Caribbean travel plans.

About a century ago, when General Motors had first proposed adding lead to gasoline in order to improve performance, scientists were alarmed and urged the government to investigate the public health implications. General Motors stepped up and graciously funded a government bureau to conduct some research, but included a clause saying that it could approve the findings.

“Thank God for life” is a common everyday expression on Tortola, the largest of the British Virgin Islands. But since Hurricane Irma smashed through the lush green landscape of the tiny British Caribbean territory less than two weeks ago, leaving at least five people dead, it has become a mantra. But other islands, notably poorer, have received less media attention.