The world of designer fashion is not for the faint of heart or the light of wallet. From a purse that sells for over $300,000, to torn shoes that look like they are well past ready for the dumpster – selling for almost $1500, the world is full of eccentric people willing to pay exorbitant amounts for their fashion fixes.

But there is one dirty little secret that the fashion aficionados want no-one to know about…

One of the biggest reasons that it’s so hard for facts to change people’s minds is that people have an incentive to keep believing what they already believe, especially if it’s a belief that’s deeply tied to their identity.

The mental gymnastics they do to achieve this are known in psychology as “motivated reasoning.” It’s something that’s extremely hard to get around.

This bill will take American healthcare back to what everyone in the U.S. should recognize was a completely broken system before the Affordable Care Act. It will take the country back to a system in which companies often profited not by how well they provided healthcare but by how well they discriminated against or screened out those who faced the most challenges.

Wow! When you have Shell Oil telling you that climate change is real, you’re either having a bad dream, an acid flashback, or the world has gone mad. But that’s exactly what happened recently when twenty-five U.S. companies signed a letter that appeared in full-page ads in the Washington, D.C. editions of the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, exhorting the president not to exit the Paris Agreement.

Can a budget be immoral? While people can debate cuts and expenditures, some say that the budget introduced this week by the Trump administration constitutes nothing less than a massive transfer of wealth from working families, the elderly, children, the sick and the poor to the top 1%. And this, they say, is an immoral act by evil people.

Sinclair already has 173 local news stations. The combined operations of the two companies will create the largest-single group of local TV stations. The acquisition is subject to regulatory approval, but the Trump administration’s FCC has signaled its openness to media consolidation.

This is another victory for conservatives in the battle for the hearts and minds of average Americans – especially those vulnerable to the type of “bumper-sticker” philosophies promoted by President Trump and the GOP.

Well-educated, high profile CEOs sometimes become synonymous with their companies.

Steve Jobs and Apple, Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook, and Jeff Bezos and Amazon. It’s hard to separate the man from the operation.

However, investing in a company simply based on its leadership might not be the best strategy, according to Warren Buffett.

President Donald Trump would like to move on from the investigation into his campaign’s ties to Russia. That’s not speculation, or imputing a motive onto Trump actions; it’s the White House’s official line.

However, the president’s enlisting “a leading law firm” to insist he has no connections to the country— is something he could easily prove if he just released his tax returns.

Juan Carlos Enriquez was born and raised in Miami, the son of Cuban immigrants. He worked for paint giant Sherwin-Williams for two decades and then decided to go into business with his brothers. Nine years ago, they launched The Paint Spot, which now has three locations in the Miami area.

In the fall of 2013, the small business got a big job. A subcontractor on the $200 million remodeling of the Trump National Doral golf resort ordered $142,000 worth of paint from Enriquez.

The paint was delivered and used, court records show. Trump Endeavor, the company that operates the resort, paid the early installments of the bill, but after the subcontractor walked off the job, Enriquez never got a final payment of about $32,000.

In October 1945, as he prepared to announce the signing of Jackie Robinson to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, Branch Rickey visited his friend, the well-known broadcaster Lowell Thomas.

“Branch, all hell will break loose!” Thomas told Rickey, as recounted by Lee Lowenfish in “Branch Rickey: Baseball’s Ferocious Gentleman.” “No, Lowell,” Rickey replied. “All heaven will rejoice.”

Eric Trump, the rich-kid son of our current president, has been telling people that it will be hard to make a living now that daddy is president.

While the Trump Organization’s revenue and income are expected to continue to rise during Mr. Trump’s term in office, it will likely be at a slower rate, Eric Trump said, because of efforts to separate the Trump presidency from the family businesses. “We would be doing 30 deals across the globe” were his father not the president, Eric Trump said in an interview.

Increasing inequality means wealthy Americans can now expect to live up to 15 years longer than their poor counterparts, reports in the British medical journal the Lancet have found.

Researchers said these disparities appear to be worsened by the American health system itself, which relies on for-profit insurance companies, and is the most expensive in the world.

Their conclusion? Treat healthcare as a human right.

U.S. computer chip and processor giant Intel will acquire the Israeli smart car tech firm Mobileye in a deal valued at $15.3 billion.

Supplying such automotive giants as General Motors and Volkswagen AG, Mobileye is one of the key producers of the onboard vision systems that anchor current advanced driver assistance systems — as well as tomorrow’s autonomous vehicle technology. The acquisition will help position Intel as a major player in the development of smart and driverless car systems.

Hundreds of former employees of Sterling Jewelers, the multibillion-dollar conglomerate behind Jared the Galleria of Jewelry and Kay Jewelers, claim that its chief executive and other company leaders presided over a corporate culture that fostered rampant sexual harassment and discrimination, according to arbitration documents obtained by The Washington Post.

AyaWorks is a provider of innovative pipeline compliance management solutions and services for oil and gas and utility companies that can help companies avoid fines and penalties, like the one just imposed on PG&E.

A federal judge sentenced PG&E for crimes linked to the deadly San Bruno pipeline explosion, imposing the maximum fine of $3 million and branding the utility as a convicted felon. The judge also ordered PG&E to submit to court-ordered supervision of its natural gas operations.

Procrastination as a productivity tool? As Microsoft’s chief experience officer, Julie Larson-Green’s job is to help people work smarter. But when it comes to her own day, she has a somewhat counter-intuitive approach. A 22-year Microsoft veteran, Larson-Green is responsible for the overarching experience of getting stuff done with Office and other tools on PCs, phones, wearables, and tablets. “We want to help you manage your scarce resource of time,” she says. Here’s how she does that herself.

This past Sunday on Meet the Press, Chuck Todd spent 13 minutes trying to get Trump spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway to explain “why President Trump sent out his press secretary to essentially litigate a provable falsehood” about Trump’s inauguration. The falsehood, delivered by Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Saturday, was that Trump had attracted “the largest audience to witness an inauguration, period.” Spicer had also dismissed photos of the crowd, claiming they “were intentionally framed” to make it look small.

There’s almost nothing harder than walking away when the time comes. Much of entrepreneurship focuses on the rise up, the hard work, grit and scrappiness it takes to get a business up and running and make it successful. Sure, we give mention to failure – builds character, and all that — but we (rightfully) celebrate success even more.

But sic transit gloria mundi. Our fame, our professional glory lasts but an eye-blink of universal time. In the end, those accomplishments you hold so dear molder in the ground along with you. They aren’t worth clinging to.

As entrepreneurs, we have to do unpleasant things. We have disagreements with clients over invoices. We have to let go of under-performing employees. We are placed in situations that encourage us to treat competitors as adversaries. And in those unpleasant situations, we are constantly being judged by how we respond.

We work hard to build businesses that benefit our employees and make the world a better place, so it’s hard to believe we’re the ones everyone is talking about at the water cooler. But, sometimes entrepreneurs do turn into jerks. So the next time you look in the mirror, do a quick self-assessment and ask yourself these 10 questions. You might be surprised.

What comes to mind when you think of the term “middle manager?” Is it someone who has little power, spends a lot of time micro-managing people and whose career is in a rut?

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that. In popular culture, middle managers get a bad rap. From “Office Space” to “The Office,” the middle manager is often hapless, mocked by his employees and bullied by executives.