The world of designer fashion is not for the faint of heart or the light of wallet. From a purse that sells for over $300,000, to torn shoes that look like they are well past ready for the dumpster – selling for almost $1500, the world is full of eccentric people willing to pay exorbitant amounts for their fashion fixes.

But there is one dirty little secret that the fashion aficionados want no-one to know about…

One of the biggest reasons that it’s so hard for facts to change people’s minds is that people have an incentive to keep believing what they already believe, especially if it’s a belief that’s deeply tied to their identity.

The mental gymnastics they do to achieve this are known in psychology as “motivated reasoning.” It’s something that’s extremely hard to get around.

This bill will take American healthcare back to what everyone in the U.S. should recognize was a completely broken system before the Affordable Care Act. It will take the country back to a system in which companies often profited not by how well they provided healthcare but by how well they discriminated against or screened out those who faced the most challenges.

Recently, after a month of breathless speculation, former FBI director James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee about the events leading up to his abrupt and dubiously-justified termination by President Trump. And, according to the good people at PornHub, users in the District Columbia streamed significantly less pornographic material than they usually do at that time.

Google has released designs for a new 11-story, 1 million-square-foot headquarters in London near King’s Cross railway station, complete with a sprawling, landscaped rooftop garden. It features a mashup of styles, including Roman columns, and a “Star Wars meets Frank Lloyd Wright on the Love Boat” style that is simply an abomination.

This may just be the ugliest building ever designed.

The gorgeously spacey keyboard introduction to “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” moves gracefully left, right and in between in sync with the surreal nature of Lennon’s lyric.

What even casual listeners are most likely to notice is that “She’s Leaving Home” is faster and higher pitched — and therefore emotionally more urgent — than the version on the 1967 original.

Wow! When you have Shell Oil telling you that climate change is real, you’re either having a bad dream, an acid flashback, or the world has gone mad. But that’s exactly what happened recently when twenty-five U.S. companies signed a letter that appeared in full-page ads in the Washington, D.C. editions of the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, exhorting the president not to exit the Paris Agreement.

This is the time of year that magazines are filled with reports about what dad really wants for Father’s Day. We are here to tell you to ignore them all. Those product mentions are usually the result of some clever PR person, and not because the writer actually has any experience knowing if Dad will actually appreciate the gift.

With that in mind, we’ve set out to provide the comprehensive list of What Dads Don’t Want this Father’s Day. If you see it on this list, avoid it.

This show promises something it doesn’t deliver: a struggling couple, stung by the real estate market downturn, putting their entire life savings into flipping houses.

What you have are two pretty people playing with other people’s money, doing lowest-common-denominator flips, and always making a profit.

Can a budget be immoral? While people can debate cuts and expenditures, some say that the budget introduced this week by the Trump administration constitutes nothing less than a massive transfer of wealth from working families, the elderly, children, the sick and the poor to the top 1%. And this, they say, is an immoral act by evil people.

You can make a ton of money in the media business, especially if you’re a CEO.

That’s the main takeaway from a new study by the AP and executive data firm Equilar, which charted CEO pay in 2016. The top seven CEOs on the list were involved in media: running cable giants, movie and TV studios, or even video-game companies.

With the 50th anniversary of the U.S. release of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the most acclaimed rock album ever and the apogee of the Beatles’ cultural influence in the 1960s, is a time for a look back at our favorite Beatles masterpieces. Your list may be different, but that’s only because there are so many fabulous songs to pick from. Guess that’s why they called them “The Fab Four.”

Here’s our picks:

Reebok has endured an unrelenting jog into oblivion from the pumped-up days of 1989. That was the year Tom Petty released Full Moon Fever, the Detroit Pistons swept the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Finals, and Reebok introduced its first inflatable shoe.

The ’80s ended with Reebok just barely sustaining a three-year streak as America’s best-selling sneaker brand, notching $1.8 billion in sales, but Nike took over the footwear crown to start the new decade and never looked back.

Heroin has become so pervasive in cities across America, and so profitable for the cartels that supply it that even cops admit the sporadic arrests they make have little effect. Cartels have begun lacing heroin with synthetic opioids including fentanyl, making a dose more addictive and cheaper to produce. Overdose reversal shots are helping addicts survive, often to use again, giving dealers a steady supply of repeat customers. With persistent demand and increasingly wide profit margins, 2017 is shaping up as the most profitable year ever for the U.S. heroin trade.

Sinclair already has 173 local news stations. The combined operations of the two companies will create the largest-single group of local TV stations. The acquisition is subject to regulatory approval, but the Trump administration’s FCC has signaled its openness to media consolidation.

This is another victory for conservatives in the battle for the hearts and minds of average Americans – especially those vulnerable to the type of “bumper-sticker” philosophies promoted by President Trump and the GOP.

Over the past 150 years, food companies and marketers in other parts of the world have taken eating in a more visually thrilling direction. They have used dyes to alter mass-produced foods—sometimes to make them less “natural” looking (cakes with bright-blue icing), sometimes to make them more “natural” looking (pickles made greener to fit with consumers’ expectations).

Both intentions are, upon further inspection, sort of strange.

There was once a time when mid-level bands with a modest following could make a pretty decent living playing music. They’d put out a record, sell a couple hundred thousand copies and then go on tour to promote it – which would drive additional sales, even as the tour itself was lucky to break even.

For the largest acts, this formula was a bona fide moneymaking bonanza, lining the pockets of all involved, including the musicians, managers, promoters and record labels. For everyone else, it didn’t produce vast riches but nonetheless supported careers and promoted the creation of new music.

Times, however, have changed.

Well-educated, high profile CEOs sometimes become synonymous with their companies.

Steve Jobs and Apple, Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook, and Jeff Bezos and Amazon. It’s hard to separate the man from the operation.

However, investing in a company simply based on its leadership might not be the best strategy, according to Warren Buffett.

President Donald Trump would like to move on from the investigation into his campaign’s ties to Russia. That’s not speculation, or imputing a motive onto Trump actions; it’s the White House’s official line.

However, the president’s enlisting “a leading law firm” to insist he has no connections to the country— is something he could easily prove if he just released his tax returns.

Donald Trump has many worrisome, regrettable and even deplorable traits. But, he has an overlooked quality that cancels out many of his bad ones. Say what you will, the man is lazy.

This is a discovery that should gladden people of all parties, philosophies, races, sexes and religions. His detractors can be glad that he will never muster the drive or discipline to actually bring many of his worst ideas to fruition. His admirers can rest easy knowing he will not work himself to death. Yes, Trump is Lazy… and that’s Good for Business.

Since President Donald Trump took office in January, Chicago area restaurants like Birrieria Zaragoza, La Chaparrita #1, L’Patron and countless others — restaurants that are daily destinations for a diverse community — have faced concerns because of the new administration’s stance on immigration issues, including the promises of a Mexico border wall and the executive order to cut off funding to so-called sanctuary cities. Here’s what they are saying:

Juan Carlos Enriquez was born and raised in Miami, the son of Cuban immigrants. He worked for paint giant Sherwin-Williams for two decades and then decided to go into business with his brothers. Nine years ago, they launched The Paint Spot, which now has three locations in the Miami area.

In the fall of 2013, the small business got a big job. A subcontractor on the $200 million remodeling of the Trump National Doral golf resort ordered $142,000 worth of paint from Enriquez.

The paint was delivered and used, court records show. Trump Endeavor, the company that operates the resort, paid the early installments of the bill, but after the subcontractor walked off the job, Enriquez never got a final payment of about $32,000.

In October 1945, as he prepared to announce the signing of Jackie Robinson to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, Branch Rickey visited his friend, the well-known broadcaster Lowell Thomas.

“Branch, all hell will break loose!” Thomas told Rickey, as recounted by Lee Lowenfish in “Branch Rickey: Baseball’s Ferocious Gentleman.” “No, Lowell,” Rickey replied. “All heaven will rejoice.”

Almost every week we hear about pipeline accidents that endanger people, property and the environment. Yet, there are readily available systems that can significantly reduce the number of pipeline accidents, by improving oversight that identifies potential problem areas.

AyaWorks is one company that provides a suite of services designed to help utility companies improve safety, increase compliance to state and federal regulations, and reduce both incidents and paperwork associated with documenting on-going field inspections. So why aren’t more utility companies using this service?

Actually, Trump owes the German bank over $1 billion, if you add up the various entities. Trump currently has two loans and two mortgages with Deutsche Bank and owes it about $340m (£270m).

The bank has also extended another $950m to a venture in which Trump owns a 30% stake, the Wall Street Journal reported in January. The debts of President Donald Trump and his businesses are scattered across Wall Street banks, mutual funds and other financial institutions, broadening the tangle of conflicts of interest.

Increasing inequality means wealthy Americans can now expect to live up to 15 years longer than their poor counterparts, reports in the British medical journal the Lancet have found.

Researchers said these disparities appear to be worsened by the American health system itself, which relies on for-profit insurance companies, and is the most expensive in the world.

Their conclusion? Treat healthcare as a human right.

As with other online retailers, the standard way of paying for items on Amazon is via credit or debit card number, that most of us have saved. But Amazon thinks it can do better. The global e-commerce leader recently announced the launch of its new Amazon Cash service, which will allow you to add cash to your Amazon account balance.

In an appalling move to keep low-wage workers locked in poverty, the Iowa legislature this week gave final approval to a bill that reverses local minimum wage increases already approved in several counties and bans cities and counties from setting any wage and benefit standards. It is the first time that a state has nullified local minimum wage ordinances that had already taken effect and forced jurisdictions to lower minimum wage rates that had previously been raised.

Apparently, clean tap water and formerly scenic vistas aren’t priorities for red state, coal-country voters who would rather add cancer clusters and horrendous birth defects to the list of woes that go along with their disappearing coal jobs.

What good are a few hundred more jobs if the workers filling those jobs, as well as their families, are dropping dead from poisoned drinking water and contaminated air?

Senator James Inhofe, Republican of Oklahoma, claimed that the Environmental Protection Agency is releasing “propaganda” that is “brainwashing our kids,” during a CNN interview on Thursday.

“We want to deliver the services. We ought to make things clean,” Inhofe said. “But we ought to take all this stuff that comes out of the EPA that’s brainwashing our kids, that is propaganda, things that aren’t true, allegations.”

U.S. computer chip and processor giant Intel will acquire the Israeli smart car tech firm Mobileye in a deal valued at $15.3 billion.

Supplying such automotive giants as General Motors and Volkswagen AG, Mobileye is one of the key producers of the onboard vision systems that anchor current advanced driver assistance systems — as well as tomorrow’s autonomous vehicle technology. The acquisition will help position Intel as a major player in the development of smart and driverless car systems.

Illinois just can’t catch a break. The state is home to 67 of the 1,000 biggest companies in the U.S. by revenue—fourth most among states. They include Boeing, Abbott Labs, Caterpillar and Kraft Foods. However, the net migration rate out of Illinois over the last five years is the worst in the U.S.

The state’s finances are also in shambles: in June 2016, Moody’s downgraded Illinois’ credit rating to Baa2—lowest in the country among the states—and maintained its negative outlook. Moody’s cited the state’s “continuing budget imbalance due to political gridlock.” It was the fourth downgrade since 2012.

Wall Street visitors and tourists will notice a new addition if they’re walking down Broadway in New York this week. About 20 feet across from the famous Charging Bull statue — a symbol of Wall Street’s strength and might that has loomed over the street since 1989 — a bronze statue of a girl stands facing it, hands on hip, a defiant expression carved into her face.

Uber is dismantling a secret weapon it used against local regulators who have been trying to curtail or shut down its ride-hailing service in some cities around the world.

But the bigger news is that Uber had this weapon at all. It positions the company as a secretive, win-at-all-costs, non-transparent organization. Just what you want in a company trying to gain your trust.

 

Hundreds of former employees of Sterling Jewelers, the multibillion-dollar conglomerate behind Jared the Galleria of Jewelry and Kay Jewelers, claim that its chief executive and other company leaders presided over a corporate culture that fostered rampant sexual harassment and discrimination, according to arbitration documents obtained by The Washington Post.

J.C. Penney announced that it will close 130 to 140 stores. That represents about 13% to 14% of their total stores. It is a big step for a company that had to pledge inventories to secure a loan a couple of years ago.

It is vital to close unproductive stores, and essential for this company to regain sales and earnings momentum. The recent satisfactory earnings results must have convinced management that it was the right time, financially and strategically, to close some stores.

Don’t be fooled by Trump’s and Republican promises to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. They could repeal it, but they can’t and won’t replace it.

They’ve tried for years to come up with a replacement that keeps at least as many people covered. Their “replacement” never appears.

So why do Republicans want to repeal Obamacare and leave millions without insurance?  Because it would mean a huge tax windfall for the wealthy.

Check-out lines at stores are usually kind of stressful, aren’t they? People are always in a rush. The cashiers are very busy. The self-checkout process can be frustrating, particularly if you’re not finding the bar code or don’t have your credit card ready. Hear that? It’s the groans from the people in line behind you when you’re forced to call for assistance because you accidentally scanned something twice. Yeah, we’ve all been there.

AyaWorks is a provider of innovative pipeline compliance management solutions and services for oil and gas and utility companies that can help companies avoid fines and penalties, like the one just imposed on PG&E.

A federal judge sentenced PG&E for crimes linked to the deadly San Bruno pipeline explosion, imposing the maximum fine of $3 million and branding the utility as a convicted felon. The judge also ordered PG&E to submit to court-ordered supervision of its natural gas operations.

You may be too young to remember the milkman, but apparently it was a real thing for many years. Through the mid-20th century the great majority of U.S. households received their milk delivered to their doors daily and the milkman was as familiar a sight in the neighborhood as the postman. Of course, as supermarkets and grocery stores proliferated, the milkman has all but been put out to pasture.

But not in New York City.

The big airlines have jumped into the “basic economy” market, competing with the super-cheap airlines that cater to the most frugal passengers.

Within hours of each other, American and United announced that they had begun selling basic economy fares that push down the price of a ticket. The lower price can come with caveats, however, including having to pay extra for space in the overhead bin, boarding last and not having the option to pre-select seats when booking the tickets.

Rick Perry might have been a safe pick as Energy Secretary, but it’s hard to argue that he was a smart one.

There are valid reasons—beyond the fact that he once argued that the U.S. Department of Energy should be shut down—that would, in a healthy democracy, disqualify Perry as the CEO of a federal agency with 13,000 employees, plus 93,000 contract workers, and an annual budget of $30 million.

The Super Bowl delivers advertisers a stunningly large audience watching live along with the added value of the rating, analysis, and dissection of each ad before as well as after the game.

Last year’s game, when the Denver Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers, drew 111.9 million viewers, according to Nielsen. That’s down a small amount from the previous year, but it’s good enough to be No. 2 of all time.

Procrastination as a productivity tool? As Microsoft’s chief experience officer, Julie Larson-Green’s job is to help people work smarter. But when it comes to her own day, she has a somewhat counter-intuitive approach. A 22-year Microsoft veteran, Larson-Green is responsible for the overarching experience of getting stuff done with Office and other tools on PCs, phones, wearables, and tablets. “We want to help you manage your scarce resource of time,” she says. Here’s how she does that herself.

Johnson and Johnson Chief Executive Officer Alex Gorsky, the head of world’s largest health-care company, called for keeping some provisions of Obamacare intact as President Donald Trump and Republicans move to repeal the law.

Gorsky, who was among a dozen top business leaders who met with Trump Monday on his first full working day as president, said Tuesday he will advocate to keep coverage of pre-existing conditions and people staying on their parents’ insurance until they are 26, as well as a competitive individual insurance market.

This past Sunday on Meet the Press, Chuck Todd spent 13 minutes trying to get Trump spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway to explain “why President Trump sent out his press secretary to essentially litigate a provable falsehood” about Trump’s inauguration. The falsehood, delivered by Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Saturday, was that Trump had attracted “the largest audience to witness an inauguration, period.” Spicer had also dismissed photos of the crowd, claiming they “were intentionally framed” to make it look small.

There’s almost nothing harder than walking away when the time comes. Much of entrepreneurship focuses on the rise up, the hard work, grit and scrappiness it takes to get a business up and running and make it successful. Sure, we give mention to failure – builds character, and all that — but we (rightfully) celebrate success even more.

But sic transit gloria mundi. Our fame, our professional glory lasts but an eye-blink of universal time. In the end, those accomplishments you hold so dear molder in the ground along with you. They aren’t worth clinging to.

Americans spend an average of 45 minutes every day commuting to and from work at an average cost of $12 per day. That works out to 187 hours and $3,000 annually, according to a survey commissioned by Citibank.

The majority of U.S. consumers (60%) said their commuting costs have increased over the last five years, with 79% indicating that the cost of gas was the biggest factor.

Many entrepreneurs chase VC funding, but the ones who fail to get it may be better off than those who do.

When faced with the frustrating constraint of limited capital, many entrepreneurs contemplate venture capital (VC) as a potential solution. Armed with a compelling vision, marketplace traction and a high revenue growth rate, these businesspeople believe that the only thing standing in their way is their lack of cash to scale the organization. And, certainly, venture capital, approached with the right mindset, can unlock the potential in bootstrapped, fast-growth businesses.

Most of us know that pessimists can be a challenge to deal with in the workplace. As a leader you need to manage pessimists by coaching them to see other options and helping them to reflect on the impact they have on those around them.

While pessimists can be a challenge to teams and leaders there are benefits of having them on your team. The book, “Step Up-Lead in Six Moments That Matter” provides leadership insights about pessimists that hadn’t occurred to me. Teams can benefit from having a pessimist.

Chris Lehane rarely wears the tailored Italian suits that he was known for during his days as a high-profile Washington operative. Now he favors the Silicon Valley uniform of jeans and Patagonia vests. He no longer plants political attacks in the news media the way he did in the Clinton White House or for Al Gore’s presidential campaign. Instead, he opts for TV spots that feature happy middle-class families promoting Airbnb, the home-sharing company where he is head of policy.

Job stress can affect your health, relationships and career, and when it becomes so extreme that it pushes you to the edge, it’s known as burnout. Burnout has been associated with debilitating physical and mental health conditions, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, feelings of alienation, depression, anxiety, and an increase in alcohol and drug use. Three symptoms of burnout are:

As entrepreneurs, we have to do unpleasant things. We have disagreements with clients over invoices. We have to let go of under-performing employees. We are placed in situations that encourage us to treat competitors as adversaries. And in those unpleasant situations, we are constantly being judged by how we respond.

We work hard to build businesses that benefit our employees and make the world a better place, so it’s hard to believe we’re the ones everyone is talking about at the water cooler. But, sometimes entrepreneurs do turn into jerks. So the next time you look in the mirror, do a quick self-assessment and ask yourself these 10 questions. You might be surprised.

What comes to mind when you think of the term “middle manager?” Is it someone who has little power, spends a lot of time micro-managing people and whose career is in a rut?

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that. In popular culture, middle managers get a bad rap. From “Office Space” to “The Office,” the middle manager is often hapless, mocked by his employees and bullied by executives.