Don’t be fooled by Trump’s and Republican promises to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. They could repeal it, but they can’t and won’t replace it.

They’ve tried for years to come up with a replacement that keeps at least as many people covered. Their “replacement” never appears.

So why do Republicans want to repeal Obamacare and leave millions without insurance?  Because it would mean a huge tax windfall for the wealthy.

Check-out lines at stores are usually kind of stressful, aren’t they? People are always in a rush. The cashiers are very busy. The self-checkout process can be frustrating, particularly if you’re not finding the bar code or don’t have your credit card ready. Hear that? It’s the groans from the people in line behind you when you’re forced to call for assistance because you accidentally scanned something twice. Yeah, we’ve all been there.

AyaWorks is a provider of innovative pipeline compliance management solutions and services for oil and gas and utility companies that can help companies avoid fines and penalties, like the one just imposed on PG&E.

A federal judge sentenced PG&E for crimes linked to the deadly San Bruno pipeline explosion, imposing the maximum fine of $3 million and branding the utility as a convicted felon. The judge also ordered PG&E to submit to court-ordered supervision of its natural gas operations.

You may be too young to remember the milkman, but apparently it was a real thing for many years. Through the mid-20th century the great majority of U.S. households received their milk delivered to their doors daily and the milkman was as familiar a sight in the neighborhood as the postman. Of course, as supermarkets and grocery stores proliferated, the milkman has all but been put out to pasture.

But not in New York City.

The big airlines have jumped into the “basic economy” market, competing with the super-cheap airlines that cater to the most frugal passengers.

Within hours of each other, American and United announced that they had begun selling basic economy fares that push down the price of a ticket. The lower price can come with caveats, however, including having to pay extra for space in the overhead bin, boarding last and not having the option to pre-select seats when booking the tickets.

Rick Perry might have been a safe pick as Energy Secretary, but it’s hard to argue that he was a smart one.

There are valid reasons—beyond the fact that he once argued that the U.S. Department of Energy should be shut down—that would, in a healthy democracy, disqualify Perry as the CEO of a federal agency with 13,000 employees, plus 93,000 contract workers, and an annual budget of $30 million.

The Super Bowl delivers advertisers a stunningly large audience watching live along with the added value of the rating, analysis, and dissection of each ad before as well as after the game.

Last year’s game, when the Denver Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers, drew 111.9 million viewers, according to Nielsen. That’s down a small amount from the previous year, but it’s good enough to be No. 2 of all time.

Procrastination as a productivity tool? As Microsoft’s chief experience officer, Julie Larson-Green’s job is to help people work smarter. But when it comes to her own day, she has a somewhat counter-intuitive approach. A 22-year Microsoft veteran, Larson-Green is responsible for the overarching experience of getting stuff done with Office and other tools on PCs, phones, wearables, and tablets. “We want to help you manage your scarce resource of time,” she says. Here’s how she does that herself.

Having great company culture is no longer just an option. Today’s workers consider it as much as they consider salary and benefits. In fact, fantastic company culture is almost expected along with other traditional benefits.

While the culture that works for one company might not work for another, you can learn a lot from companies who are doing it right, and get started on company culture hacks of your own.

Johnson and Johnson Chief Executive Officer Alex Gorsky, the head of world’s largest health-care company, called for keeping some provisions of Obamacare intact as President Donald Trump and Republicans move to repeal the law.

Gorsky, who was among a dozen top business leaders who met with Trump Monday on his first full working day as president, said Tuesday he will advocate to keep coverage of pre-existing conditions and people staying on their parents’ insurance until they are 26, as well as a competitive individual insurance market.

This past Sunday on Meet the Press, Chuck Todd spent 13 minutes trying to get Trump spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway to explain “why President Trump sent out his press secretary to essentially litigate a provable falsehood” about Trump’s inauguration. The falsehood, delivered by Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Saturday, was that Trump had attracted “the largest audience to witness an inauguration, period.” Spicer had also dismissed photos of the crowd, claiming they “were intentionally framed” to make it look small.

Buyers from all over the world flock to Gitman Bros. to get a piece of timeless American style: oxford shirts, plaids and rep ties often cut slightly slimmer to appeal to the trendy and urbane.

But when the company’s president, Chris Olberding, attended the venerable menswear trade show Pitti Uomo in Italy this month, the brand’s “Made in USA” label was an unexpected liability.

There’s almost nothing harder than walking away when the time comes. Much of entrepreneurship focuses on the rise up, the hard work, grit and scrappiness it takes to get a business up and running and make it successful. Sure, we give mention to failure – builds character, and all that — but we (rightfully) celebrate success even more.

But sic transit gloria mundi. Our fame, our professional glory lasts but an eye-blink of universal time. In the end, those accomplishments you hold so dear molder in the ground along with you. They aren’t worth clinging to.

Americans spend an average of 45 minutes every day commuting to and from work at an average cost of $12 per day. That works out to 187 hours and $3,000 annually, according to a survey commissioned by Citibank.

The majority of U.S. consumers (60%) said their commuting costs have increased over the last five years, with 79% indicating that the cost of gas was the biggest factor.

Many entrepreneurs chase VC funding, but the ones who fail to get it may be better off than those who do.

When faced with the frustrating constraint of limited capital, many entrepreneurs contemplate venture capital (VC) as a potential solution. Armed with a compelling vision, marketplace traction and a high revenue growth rate, these businesspeople believe that the only thing standing in their way is their lack of cash to scale the organization. And, certainly, venture capital, approached with the right mindset, can unlock the potential in bootstrapped, fast-growth businesses.

Most of us know that pessimists can be a challenge to deal with in the workplace. As a leader you need to manage pessimists by coaching them to see other options and helping them to reflect on the impact they have on those around them.

While pessimists can be a challenge to teams and leaders there are benefits of having them on your team. The book, “Step Up-Lead in Six Moments That Matter” provides leadership insights about pessimists that hadn’t occurred to me. Teams can benefit from having a pessimist.

Chris Lehane rarely wears the tailored Italian suits that he was known for during his days as a high-profile Washington operative. Now he favors the Silicon Valley uniform of jeans and Patagonia vests. He no longer plants political attacks in the news media the way he did in the Clinton White House or for Al Gore’s presidential campaign. Instead, he opts for TV spots that feature happy middle-class families promoting Airbnb, the home-sharing company where he is head of policy.

The Chargers’ decision to join the Rams at a splashy new stadium in Inglewood has at least one builder even more pumped up about the city’s prospects.

The promise of pro football in Inglewood, still three years away, has already given a lift to real estate developer Sandy Sigal, who is spending $15 million to renovate a 1960s-era shopping center there. 

Job stress can affect your health, relationships and career, and when it becomes so extreme that it pushes you to the edge, it’s known as burnout. Burnout has been associated with debilitating physical and mental health conditions, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, feelings of alienation, depression, anxiety, and an increase in alcohol and drug use. Three symptoms of burnout are:

As entrepreneurs, we have to do unpleasant things. We have disagreements with clients over invoices. We have to let go of under-performing employees. We are placed in situations that encourage us to treat competitors as adversaries. And in those unpleasant situations, we are constantly being judged by how we respond.

We work hard to build businesses that benefit our employees and make the world a better place, so it’s hard to believe we’re the ones everyone is talking about at the water cooler. But, sometimes entrepreneurs do turn into jerks. So the next time you look in the mirror, do a quick self-assessment and ask yourself these 10 questions. You might be surprised.

What comes to mind when you think of the term “middle manager?” Is it someone who has little power, spends a lot of time micro-managing people and whose career is in a rut?

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that. In popular culture, middle managers get a bad rap. From “Office Space” to “The Office,” the middle manager is often hapless, mocked by his employees and bullied by executives.