Americans spend an average of 45 minutes every day commuting to and from work at an average cost of $12 per day. That works out to 187 hours and $3,000 annually, according to a survey commissioned by Citibank.

The majority of U.S. consumers (60%) said their commuting costs have increased over the last five years, with 79% indicating that the cost of gas was the biggest factor.

Many entrepreneurs chase VC funding, but the ones who fail to get it may be better off than those who do.

When faced with the frustrating constraint of limited capital, many entrepreneurs contemplate venture capital (VC) as a potential solution. Armed with a compelling vision, marketplace traction and a high revenue growth rate, these businesspeople believe that the only thing standing in their way is their lack of cash to scale the organization. And, certainly, venture capital, approached with the right mindset, can unlock the potential in bootstrapped, fast-growth businesses.

Most of us know that pessimists can be a challenge to deal with in the workplace. As a leader you need to manage pessimists by coaching them to see other options and helping them to reflect on the impact they have on those around them.

While pessimists can be a challenge to teams and leaders there are benefits of having them on your team. The book, “Step Up-Lead in Six Moments That Matter” provides leadership insights about pessimists that hadn’t occurred to me. Teams can benefit from having a pessimist.

Chris Lehane rarely wears the tailored Italian suits that he was known for during his days as a high-profile Washington operative. Now he favors the Silicon Valley uniform of jeans and Patagonia vests. He no longer plants political attacks in the news media the way he did in the Clinton White House or for Al Gore’s presidential campaign. Instead, he opts for TV spots that feature happy middle-class families promoting Airbnb, the home-sharing company where he is head of policy.

The Chargers’ decision to join the Rams at a splashy new stadium in Inglewood has at least one builder even more pumped up about the city’s prospects.

The promise of pro football in Inglewood, still three years away, has already given a lift to real estate developer Sandy Sigal, who is spending $15 million to renovate a 1960s-era shopping center there. 

Job stress can affect your health, relationships and career, and when it becomes so extreme that it pushes you to the edge, it’s known as burnout. Burnout has been associated with debilitating physical and mental health conditions, such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, feelings of alienation, depression, anxiety, and an increase in alcohol and drug use. Three symptoms of burnout are:

As entrepreneurs, we have to do unpleasant things. We have disagreements with clients over invoices. We have to let go of under-performing employees. We are placed in situations that encourage us to treat competitors as adversaries. And in those unpleasant situations, we are constantly being judged by how we respond.

We work hard to build businesses that benefit our employees and make the world a better place, so it’s hard to believe we’re the ones everyone is talking about at the water cooler. But, sometimes entrepreneurs do turn into jerks. So the next time you look in the mirror, do a quick self-assessment and ask yourself these 10 questions. You might be surprised.

What comes to mind when you think of the term “middle manager?” Is it someone who has little power, spends a lot of time micro-managing people and whose career is in a rut?

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that. In popular culture, middle managers get a bad rap. From “Office Space” to “The Office,” the middle manager is often hapless, mocked by his employees and bullied by executives.