As a registered nurse and the founder and CEO of The Nurses Pub – a non-profit organization dedicated to providing assistance to nurses nationwide, Clayton oversees a vast array of projects that support nurses and student nurses, including scholarships, meals for nurses on the front lines, distribution of personal protective gear, online career building seminars, child care recommendations, and even yoga classes specially designed for healthcare professionals. 

But her biggest challenge at the moment is reaching her goal of recruiting 100,000 people to become nursing students and enter the profession. 

This bill will take American healthcare back to what everyone in the U.S. should recognize was a completely broken system before the Affordable Care Act. It will take the country back to a system in which companies often profited not by how well they provided healthcare but by how well they discriminated against or screened out those who faced the most challenges.

Increasing inequality means wealthy Americans can now expect to live up to 15 years longer than their poor counterparts, reports in the British medical journal the Lancet have found.

Researchers said these disparities appear to be worsened by the American health system itself, which relies on for-profit insurance companies, and is the most expensive in the world.

Their conclusion? Treat healthcare as a human right.

Don’t be fooled by Trump’s and Republican promises to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. They could repeal it, but they can’t and won’t replace it.

They’ve tried for years to come up with a replacement that keeps at least as many people covered. Their “replacement” never appears.

So why do Republicans want to repeal Obamacare and leave millions without insurance?  Because it would mean a huge tax windfall for the wealthy.

Johnson and Johnson Chief Executive Officer Alex Gorsky, the head of world’s largest health-care company, called for keeping some provisions of Obamacare intact as President Donald Trump and Republicans move to repeal the law.

Gorsky, who was among a dozen top business leaders who met with Trump Monday on his first full working day as president, said Tuesday he will advocate to keep coverage of pre-existing conditions and people staying on their parents’ insurance until they are 26, as well as a competitive individual insurance market.