Donald Trump’s current approval rating in Gallup’s weekly poll is just 38 percent, with 57 percent saying they disapprove. What is surprising about this isn’t that he has the lowest approval ratings of any president in recent history, but that 38% of Americans still approve of the man that has been called “The worst president ever.”

While most voters said Trump is not level-headed, honest or even fit to serve as president, some still approve of him. And that’s the problem. 

Today, even those whose job it is to sit in bunkers and await a signal to launch nuclear weapons— are tested three times per month on their ability to execute protocols. They are required to score at least 90 percent. Testing is not required for their commander in chief to be able to execute a protocol, much less his ability to demonstrate the high-level thinking that would set this process in motion.

A growing list of powerful men have faced serious consequences for sexual misconduct allegations, but the most powerful one of all has faced none. Instead, Donald Trump’s official position, as his spokeswoman Sarah Sanders recently clarified in a White House press briefing, is that the 20 women accusing him of assault and harassment are lying. Trump has also suggested some were not attractive enough for him to want to sexually assault.

This has been quite a year for America and the world. By most yardsticks, our nation seems to be going backwards: We have a billionaire president that shows no hesitation to making claims that are patently false. We have deepened the gap between rich and poor, made healthcare and college education further out of reach, eliminated environmental protections, and gave hefty tax breaks to the ultra wealthy. Here is a bit of this turbulent year in photos.

Republicans muscled the largest tax overhaul in 30 years through the Senate early Saturday, and in doing so, took off their masks and revealed to the world their true nature: that they only care about corporations and the wealthy, and that despite their repeated campaign promises to help the middle class and the poor, they never had any intentions of fulfilling those empty words that stir so many citizens to cast a vote against their own interests.

When the crowd chanted “Lock her up!” about Hillary Clinton, Michael Flynn smiled. “You’re damn right,” he told last year’s Republican national convention. “You’re exactly right. There’s nothing wrong with that! And you know why we’re saying that? We’re saying that because if I – a guy who knows this business – if I did a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today.”

Who were the worst American presidents? While it takes a rare combination of qualities such as strength of character, high principles, veracity, good judgment, and political skills to be considered the best of presidents, it takes a combination of persistent lying; failure to exercise good judgment; scandals; policies that weaken the country and hurt the economy; favoritism and cronyism; tax policy that enriches the elite while harming others; attacks on public institutions such as education, the arts, the environment, and a free and open media; and a general dereliction of duties, to be considered among the worst. The presidents listed below all shared some or more of those traits.

Congressional Republicans have argued that the tax overhaul will launch so much economic growth that it will generate additional revenue, allowing cuts to pay for themselves. But the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget said that it would not generate the kind of growth needed to pay for itself, and indeed, recent estimates from the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation found that both the House and Senate versions of a tax overhaul would add around $1.4 trillion in debt in order to pay for the tax breaks for the wealthy and corporations.

As the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico continues, Donald Trump has spent the weekend using his favorite medium, his Twitter account, not to soothe emotions or offer succor to the people of the island but to pick an increasingly acrimonious fight with the mayor San Juan, its largest city, and to tell Puerto Ricans that the lack of water, food, and electricity they are experiencing is not reality but a fabrication by the news media.

Those words were said by our President, about the people living in Puerto Rico after two hurricanes devastated the island. It is impossible to tell whether this is a conscious racist remark by Trump, or whether it is instinctive. Either way, it is something that no other modern president would have said in public, and that no one who understood the duties of the office could have done.

The Department of Education officially revoked the Obama administration’s guidance on college sexual assault.

Sexual assault has become a hyper-partisan issue, with Democrats defending the rights of victims—and Republicans indiscriminately defending the rights of the accused—at times questioning the existence of the epidemic of sexual violence on college campuses.

Can a budget be immoral? While people can debate cuts and expenditures, some say that the budget introduced this week by the Trump administration constitutes nothing less than a massive transfer of wealth from working families, the elderly, children, the sick and the poor to the top 1%. And this, they say, is an immoral act by evil people.

Sinclair already has 173 local news stations. The combined operations of the two companies will create the largest-single group of local TV stations. The acquisition is subject to regulatory approval, but the Trump administration’s FCC has signaled its openness to media consolidation.

This is another victory for conservatives in the battle for the hearts and minds of average Americans – especially those vulnerable to the type of “bumper-sticker” philosophies promoted by President Trump and the GOP.

Since President Donald Trump took office in January, Chicago area restaurants like Birrieria Zaragoza, La Chaparrita #1, L’Patron and countless others — restaurants that are daily destinations for a diverse community — have faced concerns because of the new administration’s stance on immigration issues, including the promises of a Mexico border wall and the executive order to cut off funding to so-called sanctuary cities. Here’s what they are saying:

Juan Carlos Enriquez was born and raised in Miami, the son of Cuban immigrants. He worked for paint giant Sherwin-Williams for two decades and then decided to go into business with his brothers. Nine years ago, they launched The Paint Spot, which now has three locations in the Miami area.

In the fall of 2013, the small business got a big job. A subcontractor on the $200 million remodeling of the Trump National Doral golf resort ordered $142,000 worth of paint from Enriquez.

The paint was delivered and used, court records show. Trump Endeavor, the company that operates the resort, paid the early installments of the bill, but after the subcontractor walked off the job, Enriquez never got a final payment of about $32,000.

Eric Trump, the rich-kid son of our current president, has been telling people that it will be hard to make a living now that daddy is president.

While the Trump Organization’s revenue and income are expected to continue to rise during Mr. Trump’s term in office, it will likely be at a slower rate, Eric Trump said, because of efforts to separate the Trump presidency from the family businesses. “We would be doing 30 deals across the globe” were his father not the president, Eric Trump said in an interview.

Senator James Inhofe, Republican of Oklahoma, claimed that the Environmental Protection Agency is releasing “propaganda” that is “brainwashing our kids,” during a CNN interview on Thursday.

“We want to deliver the services. We ought to make things clean,” Inhofe said. “But we ought to take all this stuff that comes out of the EPA that’s brainwashing our kids, that is propaganda, things that aren’t true, allegations.”

Don’t be fooled by Trump’s and Republican promises to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. They could repeal it, but they can’t and won’t replace it.

They’ve tried for years to come up with a replacement that keeps at least as many people covered. Their “replacement” never appears.

So why do Republicans want to repeal Obamacare and leave millions without insurance?  Because it would mean a huge tax windfall for the wealthy.

Rick Perry might have been a safe pick as Energy Secretary, but it’s hard to argue that he was a smart one.

There are valid reasons—beyond the fact that he once argued that the U.S. Department of Energy should be shut down—that would, in a healthy democracy, disqualify Perry as the CEO of a federal agency with 13,000 employees, plus 93,000 contract workers, and an annual budget of $30 million.