At least 58 people were killed and over 515 others were injured in a shooting near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Sunday, police said.

Police said the suspected gunman, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, was dead. Police said they believe Paddock, of Mesquite, Nevada, killed himself prior to police entry reported to be on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel.

As the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico continues, Donald Trump has spent the weekend using his favorite medium, his Twitter account, not to soothe emotions or offer succor to the people of the island but to pick an increasingly acrimonious fight with the mayor San Juan, its largest city, and to tell Puerto Ricans that the lack of water, food, and electricity they are experiencing is not reality but a fabrication by the news media.

Those words were said by our President, about the people living in Puerto Rico after two hurricanes devastated the island. It is impossible to tell whether this is a conscious racist remark by Trump, or whether it is instinctive. Either way, it is something that no other modern president would have said in public, and that no one who understood the duties of the office could have done.

The Department of Education officially revoked the Obama administration’s guidance on college sexual assault.

Sexual assault has become a hyper-partisan issue, with Democrats defending the rights of victims—and Republicans indiscriminately defending the rights of the accused—at times questioning the existence of the epidemic of sexual violence on college campuses.

Following the devastating Category 5 Hurricane Irma and now powerful Hurricane Maria, many travelers are concerned about their future holiday plans and what the effect has had at their favorite resorts. 

Sadly, thousands have lost homes and ability to work. We do not at all ignore their plight, but this report focuses on the damage to resorts, as a service to readers with upcoming Caribbean travel plans.

About a century ago, when General Motors had first proposed adding lead to gasoline in order to improve performance, scientists were alarmed and urged the government to investigate the public health implications. General Motors stepped up and graciously funded a government bureau to conduct some research, but included a clause saying that it could approve the findings.

“Thank God for life” is a common everyday expression on Tortola, the largest of the British Virgin Islands. But since Hurricane Irma smashed through the lush green landscape of the tiny British Caribbean territory less than two weeks ago, leaving at least five people dead, it has become a mantra. But other islands, notably poorer, have received less media attention.

You may be paying more for your Big Mac as well as many other consumer goods as a large storm continues to hit parts of the Gulf Coast with historically heavy rains. Large parts of the energy and petrochemical industries are based there and companies with a lot of stores in the area stand to lose business. While gas price spikes will be temporary, other effects of the storm will last for years.

n his departure, the nationalists lose their leader while some of Trump’s key campaign promises—the border wall, for example—still go unfulfilled. Bannon famously kept a whiteboard full of those promises in his office, checking them off as they were fulfilled.

The world of designer fashion is not for the faint of heart or the light of wallet. From a purse that sells for over $300,000, to torn shoes that look like they are well past ready for the dumpster – selling for almost $1500, the world is full of eccentric people willing to pay exorbitant amounts for their fashion fixes.

But there is one dirty little secret that the fashion aficionados want no-one to know about…

One of the biggest reasons that it’s so hard for facts to change people’s minds is that people have an incentive to keep believing what they already believe, especially if it’s a belief that’s deeply tied to their identity.

The mental gymnastics they do to achieve this are known in psychology as “motivated reasoning.” It’s something that’s extremely hard to get around.

This bill will take American healthcare back to what everyone in the U.S. should recognize was a completely broken system before the Affordable Care Act. It will take the country back to a system in which companies often profited not by how well they provided healthcare but by how well they discriminated against or screened out those who faced the most challenges.

Recently, after a month of breathless speculation, former FBI director James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee about the events leading up to his abrupt and dubiously-justified termination by President Trump. And, according to the good people at PornHub, users in the District Columbia streamed significantly less pornographic material than they usually do at that time.

Google has released designs for a new 11-story, 1 million-square-foot headquarters in London near King’s Cross railway station, complete with a sprawling, landscaped rooftop garden. It features a mashup of styles, including Roman columns, and a “Star Wars meets Frank Lloyd Wright on the Love Boat” style that is simply an abomination.

This may just be the ugliest building ever designed.

The gorgeously spacey keyboard introduction to “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” moves gracefully left, right and in between in sync with the surreal nature of Lennon’s lyric.

What even casual listeners are most likely to notice is that “She’s Leaving Home” is faster and higher pitched — and therefore emotionally more urgent — than the version on the 1967 original.

Wow! When you have Shell Oil telling you that climate change is real, you’re either having a bad dream, an acid flashback, or the world has gone mad. But that’s exactly what happened recently when twenty-five U.S. companies signed a letter that appeared in full-page ads in the Washington, D.C. editions of the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, exhorting the president not to exit the Paris Agreement.

This is the time of year that magazines are filled with reports about what dad really wants for Father’s Day. We are here to tell you to ignore them all. Those product mentions are usually the result of some clever PR person, and not because the writer actually has any experience knowing if Dad will actually appreciate the gift.

With that in mind, we’ve set out to provide the comprehensive list of What Dads Don’t Want this Father’s Day. If you see it on this list, avoid it.

This show promises something it doesn’t deliver: a struggling couple, stung by the real estate market downturn, putting their entire life savings into flipping houses.

What you have are two pretty people playing with other people’s money, doing lowest-common-denominator flips, and always making a profit.

Can a budget be immoral? While people can debate cuts and expenditures, some say that the budget introduced this week by the Trump administration constitutes nothing less than a massive transfer of wealth from working families, the elderly, children, the sick and the poor to the top 1%. And this, they say, is an immoral act by evil people.

You can make a ton of money in the media business, especially if you’re a CEO.

That’s the main takeaway from a new study by the AP and executive data firm Equilar, which charted CEO pay in 2016. The top seven CEOs on the list were involved in media: running cable giants, movie and TV studios, or even video-game companies.

With the 50th anniversary of the U.S. release of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the most acclaimed rock album ever and the apogee of the Beatles’ cultural influence in the 1960s, is a time for a look back at our favorite Beatles masterpieces. Your list may be different, but that’s only because there are so many fabulous songs to pick from. Guess that’s why they called them “The Fab Four.”

Here’s our picks:

Reebok has endured an unrelenting jog into oblivion from the pumped-up days of 1989. That was the year Tom Petty released Full Moon Fever, the Detroit Pistons swept the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Finals, and Reebok introduced its first inflatable shoe.

The ’80s ended with Reebok just barely sustaining a three-year streak as America’s best-selling sneaker brand, notching $1.8 billion in sales, but Nike took over the footwear crown to start the new decade and never looked back.

Heroin has become so pervasive in cities across America, and so profitable for the cartels that supply it that even cops admit the sporadic arrests they make have little effect. Cartels have begun lacing heroin with synthetic opioids including fentanyl, making a dose more addictive and cheaper to produce. Overdose reversal shots are helping addicts survive, often to use again, giving dealers a steady supply of repeat customers. With persistent demand and increasingly wide profit margins, 2017 is shaping up as the most profitable year ever for the U.S. heroin trade.

Sinclair already has 173 local news stations. The combined operations of the two companies will create the largest-single group of local TV stations. The acquisition is subject to regulatory approval, but the Trump administration’s FCC has signaled its openness to media consolidation.

This is another victory for conservatives in the battle for the hearts and minds of average Americans – especially those vulnerable to the type of “bumper-sticker” philosophies promoted by President Trump and the GOP.

Over the past 150 years, food companies and marketers in other parts of the world have taken eating in a more visually thrilling direction. They have used dyes to alter mass-produced foods—sometimes to make them less “natural” looking (cakes with bright-blue icing), sometimes to make them more “natural” looking (pickles made greener to fit with consumers’ expectations).

Both intentions are, upon further inspection, sort of strange.

There was once a time when mid-level bands with a modest following could make a pretty decent living playing music. They’d put out a record, sell a couple hundred thousand copies and then go on tour to promote it – which would drive additional sales, even as the tour itself was lucky to break even.

For the largest acts, this formula was a bona fide moneymaking bonanza, lining the pockets of all involved, including the musicians, managers, promoters and record labels. For everyone else, it didn’t produce vast riches but nonetheless supported careers and promoted the creation of new music.

Times, however, have changed.

Well-educated, high profile CEOs sometimes become synonymous with their companies.

Steve Jobs and Apple, Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook, and Jeff Bezos and Amazon. It’s hard to separate the man from the operation.

However, investing in a company simply based on its leadership might not be the best strategy, according to Warren Buffett.

President Donald Trump would like to move on from the investigation into his campaign’s ties to Russia. That’s not speculation, or imputing a motive onto Trump actions; it’s the White House’s official line.

However, the president’s enlisting “a leading law firm” to insist he has no connections to the country— is something he could easily prove if he just released his tax returns.

Donald Trump has many worrisome, regrettable and even deplorable traits. But, he has an overlooked quality that cancels out many of his bad ones. Say what you will, the man is lazy.

This is a discovery that should gladden people of all parties, philosophies, races, sexes and religions. His detractors can be glad that he will never muster the drive or discipline to actually bring many of his worst ideas to fruition. His admirers can rest easy knowing he will not work himself to death. Yes, Trump is Lazy… and that’s Good for Business.

Since President Donald Trump took office in January, Chicago area restaurants like Birrieria Zaragoza, La Chaparrita #1, L’Patron and countless others — restaurants that are daily destinations for a diverse community — have faced concerns because of the new administration’s stance on immigration issues, including the promises of a Mexico border wall and the executive order to cut off funding to so-called sanctuary cities. Here’s what they are saying:

Juan Carlos Enriquez was born and raised in Miami, the son of Cuban immigrants. He worked for paint giant Sherwin-Williams for two decades and then decided to go into business with his brothers. Nine years ago, they launched The Paint Spot, which now has three locations in the Miami area.

In the fall of 2013, the small business got a big job. A subcontractor on the $200 million remodeling of the Trump National Doral golf resort ordered $142,000 worth of paint from Enriquez.

The paint was delivered and used, court records show. Trump Endeavor, the company that operates the resort, paid the early installments of the bill, but after the subcontractor walked off the job, Enriquez never got a final payment of about $32,000.

The U.S. steel industry, a mainstay of the economy for more than 100 years, has been shrinking. Because of foreign imports, technology, and an overall surplus of steel throughout the world, the U.S. steel industry has struggled in recent years to keep jobs and production at steady levels.

In October 1945, as he prepared to announce the signing of Jackie Robinson to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, Branch Rickey visited his friend, the well-known broadcaster Lowell Thomas.

“Branch, all hell will break loose!” Thomas told Rickey, as recounted by Lee Lowenfish in “Branch Rickey: Baseball’s Ferocious Gentleman.” “No, Lowell,” Rickey replied. “All heaven will rejoice.”