Republicans muscled the largest tax overhaul in 30 years through the Senate early Saturday, and in doing so, took off their masks and revealed to the world their true nature: that they only care about corporations and the wealthy, and that despite their repeated campaign promises to help the middle class and the poor, they never had any intentions of fulfilling those empty words that stir so many citizens to cast a vote against their own interests.

When the crowd chanted “Lock her up!” about Hillary Clinton, Michael Flynn smiled. “You’re damn right,” he told last year’s Republican national convention. “You’re exactly right. There’s nothing wrong with that! And you know why we’re saying that? We’re saying that because if I – a guy who knows this business – if I did a tenth of what she did, I would be in jail today.”

Who were the worst American presidents? While it takes a rare combination of qualities such as strength of character, high principles, veracity, good judgment, and political skills to be considered the best of presidents, it takes a combination of persistent lying; failure to exercise good judgment; scandals; policies that weaken the country and hurt the economy; favoritism and cronyism; tax policy that enriches the elite while harming others; attacks on public institutions such as education, the arts, the environment, and a free and open media; and a general dereliction of duties, to be considered among the worst. The presidents listed below all shared some or more of those traits.

Congressional Republicans have argued that the tax overhaul will launch so much economic growth that it will generate additional revenue, allowing cuts to pay for themselves. But the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget said that it would not generate the kind of growth needed to pay for itself, and indeed, recent estimates from the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation found that both the House and Senate versions of a tax overhaul would add around $1.4 trillion in debt in order to pay for the tax breaks for the wealthy and corporations.

Mark your calendars: November 21, 2017 – the day the Internet died. For on that day, the Federal Communications Commission announced that it planned to dismantle landmark regulations that ensure equal access to the internet, clearing the way for companies to charge more and block access to some websites.

At least 58 people were killed and over 515 others were injured in a shooting near the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Sunday, police said.

Police said the suspected gunman, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, was dead. Police said they believe Paddock, of Mesquite, Nevada, killed himself prior to police entry reported to be on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel.

As the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico continues, Donald Trump has spent the weekend using his favorite medium, his Twitter account, not to soothe emotions or offer succor to the people of the island but to pick an increasingly acrimonious fight with the mayor San Juan, its largest city, and to tell Puerto Ricans that the lack of water, food, and electricity they are experiencing is not reality but a fabrication by the news media.

Those words were said by our President, about the people living in Puerto Rico after two hurricanes devastated the island. It is impossible to tell whether this is a conscious racist remark by Trump, or whether it is instinctive. Either way, it is something that no other modern president would have said in public, and that no one who understood the duties of the office could have done.

The Department of Education officially revoked the Obama administration’s guidance on college sexual assault.

Sexual assault has become a hyper-partisan issue, with Democrats defending the rights of victims—and Republicans indiscriminately defending the rights of the accused—at times questioning the existence of the epidemic of sexual violence on college campuses.

Following the devastating Category 5 Hurricane Irma and now powerful Hurricane Maria, many travelers are concerned about their future holiday plans and what the effect has had at their favorite resorts. 

Sadly, thousands have lost homes and ability to work. We do not at all ignore their plight, but this report focuses on the damage to resorts, as a service to readers with upcoming Caribbean travel plans.

About a century ago, when General Motors had first proposed adding lead to gasoline in order to improve performance, scientists were alarmed and urged the government to investigate the public health implications. General Motors stepped up and graciously funded a government bureau to conduct some research, but included a clause saying that it could approve the findings.

“Thank God for life” is a common everyday expression on Tortola, the largest of the British Virgin Islands. But since Hurricane Irma smashed through the lush green landscape of the tiny British Caribbean territory less than two weeks ago, leaving at least five people dead, it has become a mantra. But other islands, notably poorer, have received less media attention.

You may be paying more for your Big Mac as well as many other consumer goods as a large storm continues to hit parts of the Gulf Coast with historically heavy rains. Large parts of the energy and petrochemical industries are based there and companies with a lot of stores in the area stand to lose business. While gas price spikes will be temporary, other effects of the storm will last for years.

n his departure, the nationalists lose their leader while some of Trump’s key campaign promises—the border wall, for example—still go unfulfilled. Bannon famously kept a whiteboard full of those promises in his office, checking them off as they were fulfilled.

The world of designer fashion is not for the faint of heart or the light of wallet. From a purse that sells for over $300,000, to torn shoes that look like they are well past ready for the dumpster – selling for almost $1500, the world is full of eccentric people willing to pay exorbitant amounts for their fashion fixes.

But there is one dirty little secret that the fashion aficionados want no-one to know about…

One of the biggest reasons that it’s so hard for facts to change people’s minds is that people have an incentive to keep believing what they already believe, especially if it’s a belief that’s deeply tied to their identity.

The mental gymnastics they do to achieve this are known in psychology as “motivated reasoning.” It’s something that’s extremely hard to get around.

This bill will take American healthcare back to what everyone in the U.S. should recognize was a completely broken system before the Affordable Care Act. It will take the country back to a system in which companies often profited not by how well they provided healthcare but by how well they discriminated against or screened out those who faced the most challenges.

Recently, after a month of breathless speculation, former FBI director James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee about the events leading up to his abrupt and dubiously-justified termination by President Trump. And, according to the good people at PornHub, users in the District Columbia streamed significantly less pornographic material than they usually do at that time.

Google has released designs for a new 11-story, 1 million-square-foot headquarters in London near King’s Cross railway station, complete with a sprawling, landscaped rooftop garden. It features a mashup of styles, including Roman columns, and a “Star Wars meets Frank Lloyd Wright on the Love Boat” style that is simply an abomination.

This may just be the ugliest building ever designed.

The gorgeously spacey keyboard introduction to “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” moves gracefully left, right and in between in sync with the surreal nature of Lennon’s lyric.

What even casual listeners are most likely to notice is that “She’s Leaving Home” is faster and higher pitched — and therefore emotionally more urgent — than the version on the 1967 original.

Wow! When you have Shell Oil telling you that climate change is real, you’re either having a bad dream, an acid flashback, or the world has gone mad. But that’s exactly what happened recently when twenty-five U.S. companies signed a letter that appeared in full-page ads in the Washington, D.C. editions of the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, exhorting the president not to exit the Paris Agreement.

This is the time of year that magazines are filled with reports about what dad really wants for Father’s Day. We are here to tell you to ignore them all. Those product mentions are usually the result of some clever PR person, and not because the writer actually has any experience knowing if Dad will actually appreciate the gift.

With that in mind, we’ve set out to provide the comprehensive list of What Dads Don’t Want this Father’s Day. If you see it on this list, avoid it.

This show promises something it doesn’t deliver: a struggling couple, stung by the real estate market downturn, putting their entire life savings into flipping houses.

What you have are two pretty people playing with other people’s money, doing lowest-common-denominator flips, and always making a profit.

Can a budget be immoral? While people can debate cuts and expenditures, some say that the budget introduced this week by the Trump administration constitutes nothing less than a massive transfer of wealth from working families, the elderly, children, the sick and the poor to the top 1%. And this, they say, is an immoral act by evil people.